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Hyperbole Examples

Hyperbole is a figurative language technique where exaggeration is used to create a strong effect. With hyperbole, the notion of the speaker is greatly exaggerated to emphasize the point. The word "hyperbole" is actually composed of two root words: "hyper" which means "over," and "bole" which means "to throw." So, etymologically, "hyperbole" translates roughly to "over throw" or "to throw over." True to it's origins, hyperbole or language that is hyperbolic overstates a point or goes a bit too far.

1. Justice is blind and, at times, deaf.
2. Money is the only friend that I can count on.
3. The cactus saluted any visitor brave enough to travel the scorched land.
In the first example we have a metaphor (because life is being directly compared to a journey. The second and third examples are hyperboles and this is illustrated by the fact that both examples include 'like' or 'as'.
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When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle.  Then I realised that the Lord doesn't work that way so I stole  one and asked Him to forgive me.
When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle. Then I realised that the Lord doesn't work that way so I stole one and asked Him to forgive me.
Meaning: When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle. Then I realised that the Lord doesn't work that way so I stole one and asked Him to forgive me.

Good Sentences Samples
Martin Luther King Jr. was a Baptist minister and social activist, who led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968.
Martin Luther King Jr. was a Baptist minister and social activist, who led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968.


IN THESE GROUPS
Famous Baptists
Famous Capricorns
Famous People Born in Atlanta
Famous People Born in United States
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1 of 19
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quotes


“But we come here tonight to be saved from that patience that makes us patient with anything less than freedom and justice.”





































—Martin Luther King Jr.


Martin Luther King - Mini Biography
Martin Luther King - Mini Biography


Martin Luther King - Mini Biography (TV-14; 04:39) Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is widely considered the most influential leader of the American civil rights movement. He fought to overturn Jim Crow segregation laws and eliminate social and economic differences between blacks and whites.


Synopsis

Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia. King, both a Baptist minister and civil-rights activist, had a seismic impact on race relations in the United States, beginning in the mid-1950s. Among many efforts, King headed the SCLC. Through his activism, he played a pivotal role in ending the legal segregation of African-American citizens in the South and other areas of the nation, as well as the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. King received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, among several other honors. King was assassinated in April 1968, and continues to be remembered as one of the most lauded African-American leaders in history, often referenced by his 1963 speech, "I Have a Dream."







Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King Jr.'s casket being carried through streets on a mule-drawn wagon in Atlanta, April 9th, 1968.
19 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King Jr.'s casket being carried through streets on a mule-drawn wagon in Atlanta, April 9th, 1968.


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: King's family mourns the leader's death at his 1968 funeral in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo: JP Laffont/Sygma/Corbis)
20 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: King's family mourns the leader's death at his 1968 funeral in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo: JP Laffont/Sygma/Corbis)


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Street signs mark the intersection of Rosa Parks Boulevard and Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan. Parks sparked a 381-day boycott of the bus system when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white man in Alabama in 1955. The boycott was led by a little-known Baptist minister at the time, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. who earned the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. (Photo: REBECCA COOK/Reuters/Corbis)
21 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Street signs mark the intersection of Rosa Parks Boulevard and Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan. Parks sparked a 381-day boycott of the bus system when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white man in Alabama in 1955. The boycott was led by a little-known Baptist minister at the time, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. who earned the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. (Photo: REBECCA COOK/Reuters/Corbis)


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks with people after delivering a sermon on May 13, 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
1 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks with people after delivering a sermon on May 13, 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King, Jr. spending time with his son, Martin III, and daughter Yolanda. (Photo: Marvin Koner/Corbis)
2 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King, Jr. spending time with his son, Martin III, and daughter Yolanda. (Photo: Marvin Koner/Corbis)



3 of 21


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. is shown at a 1963 news conference here, in which he said that negotiations to end Birmingham's racial strife were still underway.
4 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. is shown at a 1963 news conference here, in which he said that negotiations to end Birmingham's racial strife were still underway.





Early Years

Born as Michael King Jr. on January 15, 1929, Martin Luther King Jr. was the middle child of Michael King Sr. and Alberta Williams King. The King and Williams families were rooted in rural Georgia. Martin Jr.'s grandfather, A.D. Williams, was a rural minister for years and then moved to Atlanta in 1893. He took over the small, struggling Ebenezer Baptist church with around 13 members and made it into a forceful congregation. He married Jennie Celeste Parks and they had one child that survived, Alberta. Michael King Sr. came from a sharecropper family in a poor farming community. He married Alberta in 1926 after an eight-year courtship. The newlyweds moved to A.D. Williams home in Atlanta.

Michael King Sr. stepped in as pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church upon the death of his father-in-law in 1931. He too became a successful minister, and adopted the name Martin Luther King Sr. in honor of the German Protestant religious leader Martin Luther. In due time, Michael Jr. would follow his father's lead and adopt the name himself.

Young Martin had an older sister, Willie Christine, and a younger brother, Alfred Daniel Williams King. The King children grew up in a secure and loving environment. Martin Sr. was more the disciplinarian, while his wife's gentleness easily balanced out the father's more strict hand. Though they undoubtedly tried, Martin Jr.’s parents couldn’t shield him completely from racism. Martin Luther King Sr. fought against racial prejudice, not just because his race suffered, but because he considered racism and segregation to be an affront to God's will. He strongly discouraged any sense of class superiority in his children which left a lasting impression on Martin Jr.

Growing up in Atlanta, Georgia, Martin Luther King Jr. entered public school at age 5. In May, 1936 he was baptized, but the event made little impression on him. In May, 1941, Martin was 12 years old when is grandmother, Jennie, died of a heart attack. The event was traumatic for Martin, more so because he was out watching a parade against his parents' wishes when she died. Distraught at the news, young Martin jumped from a second story window at the family home, allegedly attempting suicide.

King attended Booker T. Washington High School, where he was said to be a precocious student. He skipped both the ninth and eleventh grades, and entered Morehouse College in Atlanta at age 15, in 1944. He was a popular student, especially with his female classmates, but an unmotivated student who floated though his first two years. Although his family was deeply involved in the church and worship, young Martin questioned religion in general and felt uncomfortable with overly emotional displays of religious worship. This discomfort continued through much of his adolescence, initially leading him to decide against entering the ministry, much to his father's dismay. But in his junior year, Martin took a Bible class, renewed his faith and began to envision a career in the ministry. In the fall of his senior year, he told his father of his decision.


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Martin Luther King Jr. was a Baptist minister and social activist, who led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968.


IN THESE GROUPS
Famous Baptists
Famous Capricorns
Famous People Born in Atlanta
Famous People Born in United States
Show All Groups

























1 of 19
« »
quotes


“But we come here tonight to be saved from that patience that makes us patient with anything less than freedom and justice.”





































—Martin Luther King Jr.


Martin Luther King - Mini Biography
Martin Luther King - Mini Biography


Martin Luther King - Mini Biography (TV-14; 04:39) Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is widely considered the most influential leader of the American civil rights movement. He fought to overturn Jim Crow segregation laws and eliminate social and economic differences between blacks and whites.


Synopsis

Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia. King, both a Baptist minister and civil-rights activist, had a seismic impact on race relations in the United States, beginning in the mid-1950s. Among many efforts, King headed the SCLC. Through his activism, he played a pivotal role in ending the legal segregation of African-American citizens in the South and other areas of the nation, as well as the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. King received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, among several other honors. King was assassinated in April 1968, and continues to be remembered as one of the most lauded African-American leaders in history, often referenced by his 1963 speech, "I Have a Dream."







Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King Jr.'s casket being carried through streets on a mule-drawn wagon in Atlanta, April 9th, 1968.
19 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King Jr.'s casket being carried through streets on a mule-drawn wagon in Atlanta, April 9th, 1968.


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: King's family mourns the leader's death at his 1968 funeral in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo: JP Laffont/Sygma/Corbis)
20 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: King's family mourns the leader's death at his 1968 funeral in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo: JP Laffont/Sygma/Corbis)


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Street signs mark the intersection of Rosa Parks Boulevard and Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan. Parks sparked a 381-day boycott of the bus system when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white man in Alabama in 1955. The boycott was led by a little-known Baptist minister at the time, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. who earned the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. (Photo: REBECCA COOK/Reuters/Corbis)
21 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Street signs mark the intersection of Rosa Parks Boulevard and Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan. Parks sparked a 381-day boycott of the bus system when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white man in Alabama in 1955. The boycott was led by a little-known Baptist minister at the time, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. who earned the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. (Photo: REBECCA COOK/Reuters/Corbis)


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks with people after delivering a sermon on May 13, 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
1 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks with people after delivering a sermon on May 13, 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King, Jr. spending time with his son, Martin III, and daughter Yolanda. (Photo: Marvin Koner/Corbis)
2 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King, Jr. spending time with his son, Martin III, and daughter Yolanda. (Photo: Marvin Koner/Corbis)



3 of 21


Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. is shown at a 1963 news conference here, in which he said that negotiations to end Birmingham's racial strife were still underway.
4 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. is shown at a 1963 news conference here, in which he said that negotiations to end Birmingham's racial strife were still underway.





Early Years

Born as Michael King Jr. on January 15, 1929, Martin Luther King Jr. was the middle child of Michael King Sr. and Alberta Williams King. The King and Williams families were rooted in rural Georgia. Martin Jr.'s grandfather, A.D. Williams, was a rural minister for years and then moved to Atlanta in 1893. He took over the small, struggling Ebenezer Baptist church with around 13 members and made it into a forceful congregation. He married Jennie Celeste Parks and they had one child that survived, Alberta. Michael King Sr. came from a sharecropper family in a poor farming community. He married Alberta in 1926 after an eight-year courtship. The newlyweds moved to A.D. Williams home in Atlanta.

Michael King Sr. stepped in as pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church upon the death of his father-in-law in 1931. He too became a successful minister, and adopted the name Martin Luther King Sr. in honor of the German Protestant religious leader Martin Luther. In due time, Michael Jr. would follow his father's lead and adopt the name himself.

Young Martin had an older sister, Willie Christine, and a younger brother, Alfred Daniel Williams King. The King children grew up in a secure and loving environment. Martin Sr. was more the disciplinarian, while his wife's gentleness easily balanced out the father's more strict hand. Though they undoubtedly tried, Martin Jr.’s parents couldn’t shield him completely from racism. Martin Luther King Sr. fought against racial prejudice, not just because his race suffered, but because he considered racism and segregation to be an affront to God's will. He strongly discouraged any sense of class superiority in his children which left a lasting impression on Martin Jr.

Growing up in Atlanta, Georgia, Martin Luther King Jr. entered public school at age 5. In May, 1936 he was baptized, but the event made little impression on him. In May, 1941, Martin was 12 years old when is grandmother, Jennie, died of a heart attack. The event was traumatic for Martin, more so because he was out watching a parade against his parents' wishes when she died. Distraught at the news, young Martin jumped from a second story window at the family home, allegedly attempting suicide.

King attended Booker T. Washington High School, where he was said to be a precocious student. He skipped both the ninth and eleventh grades, and entered Morehouse College in Atlanta at age 15, in 1944. He was a popular student, especially with his female classmates, but an unmotivated student who floated though his first two years. Although his family was deeply involved in the church and worship, young Martin questioned religion in general and felt uncomfortable with overly emotional displays of religious worship. This discomfort continued through much of his adolescence, initially leading him to decide against entering the ministry, much to his father's dismay. But in his junior year, Martin took a Bible class, renewed his faith and began to envision a career in the ministry. In the fall of his senior year, he told his father of his decision.


Advertisement — Continue reading below

Meaning: Martin Luther King Jr. was a Baptist minister and social activist, who led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968. IN THESE GROUPS Famous Baptists Famous Capricorns Famous People Born in Atlanta Famous People Born in United States Show All Groups 1 of 19 « » quotes “But we come here tonight to be saved from that patience that makes us patient with anything less than freedom and justice.” —Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King - Mini Biography Martin Luther King - Mini Biography Martin Luther King - Mini Biography (TV-14; 04:39) Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is widely considered the most influential leader of the American civil rights movement. He fought to overturn Jim Crow segregation laws and eliminate social and economic differences between blacks and whites. Synopsis Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia. King, both a Baptist minister and civil-rights activist, had a seismic impact on race relations in the United States, beginning in the mid-1950s. Among many efforts, King headed the SCLC. Through his activism, he played a pivotal role in ending the legal segregation of African-American citizens in the South and other areas of the nation, as well as the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. King received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, among several other honors. King was assassinated in April 1968, and continues to be remembered as one of the most lauded African-American leaders in history, often referenced by his 1963 speech, "I Have a Dream." Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King Jr.'s casket being carried through streets on a mule-drawn wagon in Atlanta, April 9th, 1968. 19 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King Jr.'s casket being carried through streets on a mule-drawn wagon in Atlanta, April 9th, 1968. Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: King's family mourns the leader's death at his 1968 funeral in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo: JP Laffont/Sygma/Corbis) 20 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: King's family mourns the leader's death at his 1968 funeral in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo: JP Laffont/Sygma/Corbis) Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Street signs mark the intersection of Rosa Parks Boulevard and Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan. Parks sparked a 381-day boycott of the bus system when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white man in Alabama in 1955. The boycott was led by a little-known Baptist minister at the time, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. who earned the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. (Photo: REBECCA COOK/Reuters/Corbis) 21 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Street signs mark the intersection of Rosa Parks Boulevard and Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan. Parks sparked a 381-day boycott of the bus system when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white man in Alabama in 1955. The boycott was led by a little-known Baptist minister at the time, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. who earned the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. (Photo: REBECCA COOK/Reuters/Corbis) Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks with people after delivering a sermon on May 13, 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) 1 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks with people after delivering a sermon on May 13, 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King, Jr. spending time with his son, Martin III, and daughter Yolanda. (Photo: Marvin Koner/Corbis) 2 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Martin Luther King, Jr. spending time with his son, Martin III, and daughter Yolanda. (Photo: Marvin Koner/Corbis) 3 of 21 Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. is shown at a 1963 news conference here, in which he said that negotiations to end Birmingham's racial strife were still underway. 4 of 21-Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Gallery: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. is shown at a 1963 news conference here, in which he said that negotiations to end Birmingham's racial strife were still underway. Early Years Born as Michael King Jr. on January 15, 1929, Martin Luther King Jr. was the middle child of Michael King Sr. and Alberta Williams King. The King and Williams families were rooted in rural Georgia. Martin Jr.'s grandfather, A.D. Williams, was a rural minister for years and then moved to Atlanta in 1893. He took over the small, struggling Ebenezer Baptist church with around 13 members and made it into a forceful congregation. He married Jennie Celeste Parks and they had one child that survived, Alberta. Michael King Sr. came from a sharecropper family in a poor farming community. He married Alberta in 1926 after an eight-year courtship. The newlyweds moved to A.D. Williams home in Atlanta. Michael King Sr. stepped in as pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church upon the death of his father-in-law in 1931. He too became a successful minister, and adopted the name Martin Luther King Sr. in honor of the German Protestant religious leader Martin Luther. In due time, Michael Jr. would follow his father's lead and adopt the name himself. Young Martin had an older sister, Willie Christine, and a younger brother, Alfred Daniel Williams King. The King children grew up in a secure and loving environment. Martin Sr. was more the disciplinarian, while his wife's gentleness easily balanced out the father's more strict hand. Though they undoubtedly tried, Martin Jr.’s parents couldn’t shield him completely from racism. Martin Luther King Sr. fought against racial prejudice, not just because his race suffered, but because he considered racism and segregation to be an affront to God's will. He strongly discouraged any sense of class superiority in his children which left a lasting impression on Martin Jr. Growing up in Atlanta, Georgia, Martin Luther King Jr. entered public school at age 5. In May, 1936 he was baptized, but the event made little impression on him. In May, 1941, Martin was 12 years old when is grandmother, Jennie, died of a heart attack. The event was traumatic for Martin, more so because he was out watching a parade against his parents' wishes when she died. Distraught at the news, young Martin jumped from a second story window at the family home, allegedly attempting suicide. King attended Booker T. Washington High School, where he was said to be a precocious student. He skipped both the ninth and eleventh grades, and entered Morehouse College in Atlanta at age 15, in 1944. He was a popular student, especially with his female classmates, but an unmotivated student who floated though his first two years. Although his family was deeply involved in the church and worship, young Martin questioned religion in general and felt uncomfortable with overly emotional displays of religious worship. This discomfort continued through much of his adolescence, initially leading him to decide against entering the ministry, much to his father's dismay. But in his junior year, Martin took a Bible class, renewed his faith and began to envision a career in the ministry. In the fall of his senior year, he told his father of his decision. Advertisement — Continue reading below

- Bruno Mars (Song: Grenade)
Music Love Song Bruno Mars
O, my offense is rank, it smells to heaven,
It hath the primal eldest ctpon't...

Meaning: In this soliloquy, Claudius confesses the deed and recoils at its smell. It is "rank" (that is, "rancid"), so rank that the vile odor wafts all the way to heaven.

- William Shakespeare (Play: Hamlet)
Hamlet William Shakespeare
Hyperbole Meaning
What is a hyperbole?
hyperbole, a figure of speech that is an intentional exaggeration for emphasis or comic effect. Hyperbole is common in love poetry, in which it is used to convey the lover's intense admiration for his beloved.
Hyperbole ExamplesThis illustrates a hyperbole directly comparing life with riding a bicycle using the word "like". To keep your life balanced you must keep moving just as you would riding a bicycle.